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Klencke route

2 hour 36 minutes (52.0 km)
Managed by: Recreatieschap Drenthe

De Klencke (one of the seven remaining manor houses in Drenthe) and the estate are owned by Natuurmonumenten consist of the 13th-century manor, a number of farmsteads and the 450-hectare estate with farmland, forest and heathland. The current house was built in 1760. The water adjacent to De Klencke, Drostendiep, provides the house’s canals with water.

The Klencke route takes place in Southeast Drenthe. This region has plenty of things t…

De Klencke (one of the seven remaining manor houses in Drenthe) and the estate are owned by Natuurmonumenten consist of the 13th-century manor, a number of farmsteads and the 450-hectare estate with farmland, forest and heathland. The current house was built in 1760. The water adjacent to De Klencke, Drostendiep, provides the house’s canals with water.

The Klencke route takes place in Southeast Drenthe. This region has plenty of things to do for young and old. The biggest attraction is in Emmen: WILDLANDS Adventure Zoo. A paradise for adventurers and animal lovers. But certainly also worth a visit is the only castle in Drenthe or the Coevorden municipal museum in the fortified town of the same name. There is plenty to do for children in this area. As well as WILDLANDS, Plopsa Indoor Coevorden is a great day out too. Children’s idols Kabouter Plop, Bumba or Maya are all present and waiting to meet you. The open-air museum Veenpark in Barger-Compascuum invites you to take a narrow-gauge train or boat to visit a clog maker, baker or peat cutter.

TIP: A fun alternative in the area is a walk through the unique raised bogs at Bargerveen

This 50-kilometre cycling route (Klencke route) leads you past a variety of Drenthe’s highlights.

 The route starts at De Klencke manor house (Hub point 71). There is plenty of parking available near the starting point, at Klenkerweg 18.

The route includes the following bicycle hub points: 71, 29, 28, 27, 26, 25, 22, 09, 20, 77, 56, 07, 55, 89, 88, 70, 68, 67, 72.

This route can be shortened at the following hub points: 71, 29, 25, 09, 07, 89, 70.

Sights on this route

71
29 28 27 26 25

Hoofdstraat 141
7755 NR Dalerveen
22 09 20

Plopsa Indoor Coevorden

Reindersdijk 57
7751 SH Dalen
Plopsa Indoor Coevorden
77

Haven 4
7741 JV Coevorden

Kerkstraat 1
7741 JW Coevorden

Kerkstraat 6
7741 JC Coevorden

Friesestraat 9
7741 GR Coevorden

Markt
Coevorden

Kasteel
7741 Coevorden

Kasteel 4
Coevorden

Het Kasteel 29
7741 GC Coevorden

Van Heutszpark 8
7741 CV Coevorden

van Heutszpark 10
Coevorden

Ballastweg 6
7741 ZL Coevorden

De Bente

De Bente 40
7751 GM Dalen
De Bente
56 07 18

Hoofdstraat 15
7751 GA Dalen

Jan Pol

Molenwijk 8
7751 CG Dalen
Jan Pol
55 89

Schaapveensweg 16
7863 TE Gees

Dorpsstraat
Gees
88

Geserweg 2
7861 BL Oosterhesselen
70 68

Jantina Helling

Molenwijk 13
7854 PV Aalden
Jantina Helling
67

De Wheem 10
7851 TA Zweeloo

Bennevelderstraat 28
7856 TB Benneveld
72

Klenkerweg 18
7861 TG Oosterhesselen
71

Directions

71
  • De Klencke manor house is situated at the Klenckerweg between Oosterhesselen and Sleen. The word 'klencke' means a shallow spot in a river or brook. This probably refers to the Drostendiep adjoining the manor house. The Drostendiep is said to be named after one of the inhabitants of the house: Cornelis van Dongen tot de Klencke. He was the king’s representative from 1743 to 1748. This means he was the head of the ruling power in Drenthe. A manor house was a fortified residential building surrounded by land, inhabited by a noble family. The fields were leased to local farmers, who were allowed to work the land in return for a share of the harvest. There were also five farmsteads that belonged to De Klencke, and these were leased too. The inhabitants of the manor house had various rights: for instance, they were permitted to decide on who would carry out important jobs in the surrounding area, such as vicar, schoolteacher, verger and church warden. The manor house was given a political role at the start of the 17th century. The noblemen who wanted to join the Drenthe knighthood, had to live in a manor house. The Knighthood formed the governance of Drenthe. After 1644 it was decided that no more houses would be elevated to the status of manor house. This meant the power over Drenthe fell into the hands of a few noble families. Several families lived at De Klencke manor house. This was because the upkeep of a manor house was very costly. Once the owners could no longer afford the maintenance, they had to sell the house. Marriages could also cause the house to change hands. The last family to live here was the Van der Wijck family. At the start of the 20th century, the manor house was no longer used as a residence, but rented out instead. The manor house fulfilled various new roles, from youth hostel to youth shelter.
  • After a look around the impressive manor house De Klencke, the route continues to Coevorden via Den Hool and Dalerveen.
  • Coevorden started evolving in 1150 at a passable place in a river. Soon after, a castle was built in Coevorden to defend one of the few access points into Drenthe from the south. The castle is one of two to be built in Drenthe still in existence. 
    Well-known sights in addition to the castle are the inner and outer city canals with restored bastions, the Arsenaal (1643) with museum, the Reformed cruciform Church (1645), the 322-metre high water tower and the statues of Drie Podagristen in front of the castle and the Gooseherd on the Market.
  • The cycling route guides you from Coevorden to Dalen. Within the current municipality of Coevorden, De Klencke was not the only manor house. Until 1914, there was a beautiful house at the Hoofdstraat in Dalen. The house was called ‘Het Kymmellshuis’ by the locals.
    In 1843, the drie podagristen described De Kymmellborg as a building with an authoritative appearance and a stone-hewn family crest above the door. The gardens they walked past were hidden behind tall hedges. Many generations of the prominent Kymmell regent family lived in this house.
  • Dalen was originally a village green that has expanded considerably due to newly constructed housing estates. Despite this, there are still many characteristic farmsteads. The village can boast a large number of sights. The Dutch Reformed Church dates from the 14th century and is characterised by its immaculate interior. d'Aolle Bakkerij on the Hoofdstraat, now a bistro, has an old baker’s oven with accessories from 1832 on display. Dalen is known as the ‘village among the mills’. The village has two nearby mills: the Jan Pol tower mill from 1876 and De Bente tower mill from 1814. Both mills are still operational and can be viewed at certain times.
  • The next place along the map is Gees. Gees is home to the largest glacial erratic in the Netherlands. This historical example weighs as much as 35 tonnes and is 2.30 m high, 3.90 m long and 2.75 metre wide. Gees was established in 1210. Up to about 1860, Gees was the most important village in the region. Gees is mainly known for its old farmsteads. Twelve farms have bee awarded monument status and there are dozens of sheds and sheepfolds that are absolutely worth a visit.
  • The next ‘stop’ along the Klencker route is in Oosterhesselen. Oosterhesselen was established at the same time as Gees. The church in the village is remarkable as it has a separate church tower dating back to the 15th century. The inside of the church bears the Van In- en Kniphausen family crest: the owners of De Klencke. Partly thanks to them, Oosterhesselen became more important than Gees.
    The crossing of the Hoogeveen-Nieuw-Amsterdam and Coevorden-Assen tramlines gave the village the nickname of ‘Klein-Utrecht’.
  • The route leads you to Aalden via the grasslands of Beekdal Kerkhorsten. This natural landscape is a lot more humid. Thanks to the iron-rich seep, this area is now home to plants such as the marsh marigold, water violet and water horsetail. There are common snipes, deer and dozens of dragonfly species; in other words: a magnificent brook valley.
  • The Aalden mill is situated on the southwest side of Aalden. This hill mill was built in 1891 after a predecessor burnt down after a heavy thunderstorm. To the south of the village are centuries-old farmsteads. The best-known farmstead is the ‘Hoes van Hol An’ from 1688. The Brink with its old sheepfold and old weigh house lies adjacent to the old farmstead.
  • The route leads from Aalden to Zweeloo. This is the Drenthe village Vincent van Gogh visited on a day trip from Nieuw-Amsterdam in 1883. He was inspired by the little Reformed church that reminded him of the painting L’Eglise de Greville by Jean-Francoise Millet he saw in Paris. It is where he created the ‘Reformed Church in Zweeloo’, that reminded him of the painting L’Eglise de Greville by Jean-Francoise Millet he saw in Paris. He captured the church in a beautiful sketch. Zweeloo has moved with modern times, but it is still very clear from the Brink that this was a very picturesque place in the 19th century and even before. Zweeloo is the last village on this cycling route. Use Hub points 67 and 72 to continue your route back to ‘De Klencke’.
71
71
29
28
27
26
25
22
09
20
77
56
07
18
55
89
88
70
68
67
72
71